Events

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 12:00pm
The Sienese poet Meo dei Tolomei (ca. 1260-ca. 1310) is recognized as an important figure in the comic poetry of the Italian Middle Ages.  He specialized in vituperium, the poetics of insult and denigration.  During the High Middle Ages, all literature was said to be a subset of ethics, and it performed its ethical functions in two ways: the praise of the virtuous, and the reprehension of the sinful.  In repeated poems, Meo targeted three individuals in particular: his brother Mino, his mother, and Ciampolino, an ex-lover.  In Professor Alfie’s talk, he will analyze Meo’s invectives against Ciampolino.  In it, he will discuss the medieval notions of sodomy (there was no concept of a “sexual orientation,” like homosexuality), and... Read more
Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 7:00pm
Welcome To This House (2015), is a feature documentary film on the homes and loves of poet Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979), about life in the shadows, and the anxiety of art making without full self-disclosure.  Hammer filmed in Bishop’s ‘best loved homes’ in the US, Canada, and Brazil believing that buildings and landscapes bear cultural memories.  Interviews with poets, friends, and scholars provide “missing documents” of numerous female lovers. Bishop’s intimate poetry is beautifully performed by Kathleen Chalfant and with the creative music composition by Joan La Barbara brings Bishop into our lives with new facts and unexpected details. Please join us for a screening and Q&A with Barbara Hammer at The Loft Cinema. Barbara... Read more
Friday, September 30, 2016 - 5:00pm
As new technology-mediated forms of interaction, learning, and meaning making have increasingly become integrated into all domains of life, from everyday to academic, foreign language educators and researchers have embraced the concept of Digital Literacies to frame new understandings and pedagogies. At the same time, the field of CALL (Computer-assisted Language Learning) has also evolved to consider new technologies as tutors, tools, environments, and ecologies for language learning. Theoretical, methodological, and pedagogical practices have differed, even as goals align. Building on the successes of the 2014 symposium, this year’s L2DL symposium, Digital Literacies and Technology-Enhanced Language Learning: Interdisciplinary... Read more
Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 4:00pm
Celebrate the release of world renowned poet and writer Richard Shelton’s forthcoming family memoir Nobody Rich or Famous. A tale of poverty and its attendant sorrows: alcoholism, neglect, and abuse. Nobody Rich or Famous immerses us in the hardscrabble lives of his Boise, Idaho, clan during the 1930s and ’40s, where the tenacity of the human spirit shines through. This is an epic tale of Steinbeckian proportions, but it is not fiction. This is memoir in its finest tradition, illuminating today’s cultural chasm between the haves and have-nots. In the Shelton’s words, Nobody Rich or Famous is “the story of a family and how it got that way.”
Wednesday, October 5, 2016 - 4:00pm
Please join us for a panel discussion on Immigration, European, and American Perspectives taking place during the "Germany Meets the US" week of events which focuses on Germany-US relations. This event is sponsored by the College of Humanities, Department of German Studies, American Indian Studies, the School of Government & Public Policy, and the College of Social and Behavioral Studies. Question? Please contact Samantha Taibi at 621-0210. For more information on other events taking place during Germany Meets the US, please refer to the Department of German Studies website: http://german.arizona.edu/event/germany-meets-united-states-week-events
Thursday, October 6, 2016 - 7:00pm
Starting in October 2016, the UA Poetry Center features eight world-class poets as they address what overlaps, contradictions, mutual challenges, and confluences the categories of Climate Change & Poetry share with each other; in a series of investigative readings, we hope to offer some answers, some questions, and some new ways of thinking.  In this second installment of readings built around a common question, we wonder: what role does poetry have in envisioning, articulating, or challenging our ecological present? What role does poetry have in anticipating, shaping - or even creating -our future?  These presentations, part reading and part craft talk, will take place at the UA Poetry Center over the 2016-17 Reading & Lecture... Read more
Saturday, October 8, 2016 - 5:00pm
Please join us at the 10th annual UA President’s African American Community Council’s Wildcat Welcome Back on October 8th from 5-8pm.  Participants will have the opportunity to engage in speed mentoring and networking with local business professionals and community leaders. The Africana Studies Program and the College of Humanities are among the major co-sponsors of this event and students and faculty are encouraged to attend.
Monday, October 10, 2016 - 4:00pm
Russia is one of the world’s largest countries in terms of land mass, but it may come as a surprise to learn that it is also one of the most diverse. Learn about Russia’s ethnic and religious minority groups, including their relationship to mainstream society in the Soviet and post-Soviet eras. By discussing works of literature by Siberian indigenous writers, as well as theater performances by Central Asian migrant workers, discover how the country’s most vulnerable voices can offer new and crucial perspectives on life in contemporary Russia. Part of the Tucson Humanities Festival, a series of topical lectures, panel discussions and events presented by UA College of Humanities faculty and special guests. For more information, including the... Read more
Monday, October 10, 2016 - 5:30pm
A true melting pot, the UA and Tucson landscapes have changed dramatically in response to social changes and our ever-evolving world. As a community, how do we make adjustments to help us be as successful as possible in such a diverse and global world? In creating safe places for everyone, students, staff and the community must learn how to adapt to new situations and cultures. Discuss key concepts of intercultural competence with a panel of faculty and international students as they share their efforts to make the UA a refuge for people from across the globe, who bring with them cultural diversity that enriches the entire UA and Tucson community. Part of the Tucson Humanities Festival, a series of topical lectures, panel discussions and... Read more
Monday, October 10, 2016 - 7:00pm
Listen to the “coming out” narratives of queer Maghrebi (North African) and Maghrebi French men who moved to or grew up in contemporary France. Follow their paths of resilient refuge as these sexual minorities articulate and pioneer their own sexual differences within their Muslim families of origin and secularly contemporary French society where they are seen as post-colonial outsiders. Through recent narratives and cultural productions, including performance art and photography, films, novels, aut0biographies, published letters, and other first-person essays, discover how these queer men living in France construct kinship and imagine their own future. Join us for refreshments at 6:30 p.m. before the talk. Part of the Tucson Humanities... Read more

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