Events

Monday, February 15, 2016 - 2:00pm
Please join the Africana Studies Program for a film screening of the documentary Bars4Justice as part of Black History Month. Bars4Justice is a documentary short film shot on location in Ferguson which addresses Hip-Hop's role in the movement for social justice and racial injustices. The film follows Emcee/Activist Jasiri X who was invited to perform at Mike Brown's benefit concert on August 9, 2015 along with Common, Talib Kweli, Immortal Technique, Cornell West, and Bree Newsome.  Hip hop is the main influencer of youth in America and all over the world. Through dialogue and education eventually we will be able to reduce the demand for negative music by increasing the public’s access to inspiring cultural narratives. Please join us for a... Read more
Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 7:00pm
This series is presented with support from the UA Confluencenter for Creative Inquiry and the Africana Studies Department. This spring, the UA Poetry Center features Terrance Hayes, Kimiko Hahn, Khadijah Queen, and Adrian Matejka in a series called “Spectacular Poetics, or the Poetry of Spectacle.” Each of these four world-class poets will address overlaps, contradictions, and confluences between poetry & spectacle. These presentations, part reading and part craft talk, will take place at the Poetry Center on four Thursdays in February. Khadijah Queen is the author of Conduit (Akashic 2008), Black Peculiar (Noemi Press 2011), and Fearful Beloved (Argos 2015). In 2014, she won the Leslie Scalapino... Read more
Saturday, February 20, 2016 - 10:00am
Family Days is a series of creative-writing workshops for youth ages 0 to 13. One Saturday a month, youth and their parents are encouraged to attend these hour-long workshops together then stay for breakfast concerts featuring healthy food and live music. 
Monday, February 22, 2016 - 6:00pm
This symposium will feature speakers talking about such topics as human rights, migration flows in the US, Europe, and Africa, terrorism, war conflicts, and freedom of expression. Lectures and discussions will focus on contemporary national and transnational issues such as Ferguson, Charleston, Baltimore, Charlie Hebdo, Paris attacks, and the global refugee crisis. Part of Black History Month Sponsors Africana Studies Program Department of French and Italian College of Humanities Dates February 22, 23 and 24th at 6pm Location Rubel Room, UA Poetry Center 1508 E. Helen Street Tucson, AZ 85721 This symposium is free and open to the public. More Details
Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 5:00pm
William Maxwell explores the enigmatic gravity of the past, which compels us to keep explaining it even as it makes liars out of us every time we try. On a winter morning in the 1920s, a shot rings out on a farm in rural Illinois. A man named Lloyd Wilson has been killed, and the tenuous friendship between two lonely teenagers—one privileged yet neglected, the other a troubled farm boy—has been shattered. Fifty years later, one of those boys—now a grown man—tries to reconstruct the events that led up to the murder. Out of memory and imagination, the surmises of children, and the destructive passions of their parents, Maxwell creates a luminous American classic of youth and loss. It won a National Book Award in 1982.  
Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 7:00pm
“What good actor today is not a Jew?” Friedrich Nietzsche asked in 1882, posing a question that drew on a long tradition of regarding the Jews’ efforts at integration into the modern world as a mode of dissimulation. In his lecture, Jonathan Hess will explore the real and symbolic roles that the theatre played in shaping Jewish identity and the relations between Germans and Jews in the centuries before the Holocaust. Hess will examine antisemitic conceptions of Jews as actors and mimics while also considering the positive role that the theatre played in promoting idealized conceptions of Jews and creating a liberal culture of sympathy with Jewish suffering. This Robert A. Burns lecture is sponsored by the UA College of Humanities and the... Read more
Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 7:00pm
This series is presented with support from the UA Confluencenter for Creative Inquiry and the Africana Studies Department. This spring, the UA Poetry Center features Terrance Hayes, Kimiko Hahn, Khadijah Queen, and Adrian Matejka in a series called “Spectacular Poetics, or the Poetry of Spectacle.” Each of these four world-class poets will address overlaps, contradictions, and confluences between poetry & spectacle. These presentations, part reading and part craft talk, will take place at the Poetry Center on four Thursdays in February. Adrian Matejka was born in Nuremberg, Germany and grew up in California and Indiana. He is a graduate of Indiana University and the MFA program at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. His first... Read more
Saturday, February 27, 2016 - 1:00pm
Trends in spoken word and hip-hop poetry fuel performances by high-school students throughout Southern Arizona as they compete for the chance to proceed to state and national finals. The National Poetry Out Loud Competition, created by the NEA and The Poetry Foundation, encourages the nation’s youth to learn about great poetry through memorization and recitation. The University of Arizona Poetry Center is proud to serve as the Southern Arizona Regional partner.
Tuesday, March 1, 2016 - 10:00am
Men In Tights, Women Who Fight: Gender, Race, and Superheroes Professor Monica Casper, Department of Gender and Women's Studies   TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. March 1 - April 5, 2016. No class on March 15.   Tuition: $105 Register here. Superman, Wonder Woman, Spiderman, Batman, Captain America, Green Lantern, Iron Man, Black Widow--the list of America’s superheroes is long. Comic books, TV, and cinema have long built up the appeal of superheroes, and they remain popular. Embodiments of cultural meanings, social practices, and political imaginaries, superheroes tell us stories about ourselves. Historically, representations of superheroes have been connected to national security and the Cold... Read more
Thursday, March 3, 2016 - 7:00pm
UA Prose Series readings are co-sponsored by the UA College of Social & Behavioral Sciences and the Department of English. The UA Prose Series, curated by faculty of the Creative Writing Program at the UA, presents prose writers of distinction. In the first Prose Series event of 2016, James Hannaham, author of the novels Delicious Foods and God Says No, reads from his work, to be followed by a brief Q&A James Hannaham is the author of the novels Delicious Foods (Little, Brown 2015) and God Says No (McSweeney’s 2009), and has published stories in One Story, Fence, Story Quarterly, and BOMB. He has exhibited text-based visual art at The Center for Emerging Visual Artists, 490... Read more

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